Archives for Warehousing Systems

Intangible Benefits of Warehouse Management Systems

We often talk about the tangible benefits of a warehouse management system and how it is fairly easy to measure the return on investment of these tangible benefits.  Many times we get caught up in the savings a company can realize by creating accurate inventories or efficient picking processes that we lose sight of some of the most important things a warehouse management system can deliver.  Here is a short list of intangible benefits as well:

  • More efficient use of lift trucks will preclude the need to purchase additional equipment.
  • Cycle count routines will be more accurate and less time consuming.
  • Improved customer service as a result of accurate, real-time data
  • Job enrichment for users.
  • A sense of value in improving operations.
  • Reduced floor space as a result of faster throughput.
  • Tighter purchasing procedures through more timely visibility of vendors incoming products
  • Automatic cross-docking for critical deliveries.
  • Real-time visibility of goods/materials received can eliminate “stock out” situations
  • Automatic order sequencing by shipping routes.
  • Eliminate error prone pick lists and paper trails.
  • Reduce or eliminate checking process during order packaging.
  • Increased sales due to ability to trust inventory
  • Better data can provide management with tools to improve and grow business

Each and every company will have a list that is specific to their business or industry.  The fact remains that these benefits, while harder to measure, will accelerate a company’s ROI when purchasing and implementing a warehouse management system.

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Posted by iCepts Technology Group, Inc. a HighJump Warehouse Edge Partner in Pennsylvania.

Enterprise Systems to WMS Integration

Warehouse Management Systems are becoming popular as supply chain logistics become ever more complicated along with increasing customer demands.  With an escalating volume of inventory movement, many organizations are turning to technology to streamline operations and meet these challenges. Seamless Enterprise Systems to WMS Integration can help your company reach its supply chain operational goals.

Advanced technology through Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) allow companies to respond to evolving market pressures and deliver on ever-shrinking time to delivery windows. These systems efficiently capture every scan, every movement of inventory and are designed to make both accuracies along with cost reduction a top priority.

Improving the speed and accuracy of the fulfillment process and reducing the cost of labor are the key issues that distribution and warehouse-related businesses face. Gaining control over these issues requires technology that optimizes the utilization of your people and your assets–more than an automated data collection system that simply extends the paper processes leveraged from within some ERP System. ERP systems typically have extensive financial and inventory control functionality, however, not enough capabilities when advanced warehouse demands are required.

HighJump Warehouse Edge was built to empower you to automate your warehouse using tools like conveyors, carousels, sophisticated picking algorithms, advance replenishment methods, and order allocation, delivered in a simple, intuitive solution that can be implemented quickly and efficiently-providing your company the advanced warehousing inventory control functionality you need.

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Posted by iCepts Technology Group, Inc. A HighJump Partner in the United States.

How WMS Software Can Save Money for your Company

Warehouse Technology Systems, commonly called Warehouse Management Systems (WMS), are designed to make the movement of inventory in and out of the warehouse as efficient as possible. Through advanced functionality such as different inventory picking options, lot and serial management, cycle counting, bin placement,  space management, ERP to WMS integration and others; warehouse management improvements can be realized that can offer significant savings from having increase accuracy, fewer errors and reduce labor cost.

Increased Accuracy-If the physical inventory “on the books” and the physical inventory in a warehouse do not match, the situation is often chaotic. When a warehouse picker goes to retrieve a part and it is not there (or not enough is there), a series of manual checks and back tracking must be completed to fix the problem and get the order out the door. Inaccurate inventory results can have broad consequences including:Savings

  • Poor buying practices and excess safety stock associated to buyers lack of confidence in record accuracy
  • Delays in order fulfillment associated to lost or misplaced product
  • Lost sales due to stock outs and over commitments
  • Costs associated to placing and managing back orders
  • Lower labor productivity associated to searching for lost product
  • Potentially higher freight costs resulting from expediting shipments to customers

Example: These issues could result in excess inventory, which ties up capital and negatively impacts capacity. The results are higher costs, low productivity and bad customer service. The self-checking nature of a WMS, in addition to a good cycle counting program, ensures inventory accuracy of 99.9%. This high level of inventory accuracy is the foundation for a majority of the other benefits realized in using a WMS. Inventory may be the highest asset in your company.  What is the financial impact of 95% inventory accuracy compared to 99.9% over the course of a month or year?

Fewer Errors-A real-time Radio Frequency (RF), ie. Hand Held Bar Code Scanning driven WMS is self-checking. As transactions occur, the system verifies the activity and may even prompt the user with a question if the system detects a potential problem. In a paper-based environment, errors are common across all functional areas. The impact of an error in one function is amplified throughout the overall operation. An error in receiving (wrong product number, wrong quantity, etc.) will create potential delays across many operations.

Example: Let’s assume 20 cases of part A are received as 200 cases, a put-a-way operator may spend considerable time searching for the extra 180 cases. In a non-automated environment, it is common to have operators putting away whatever product is in a staging queue without checking product numbers or quantities. In this instance, the
quantity error in receiving will get pushed even further downstream as operators are sent to pick 40 cases from the
load with only 20 cases physically on hand. Also, if an automatic payment correction is generated, you may end up requesting approval for payment of an additional 180 ghost cases.

In a paper based manual data entry environment, there is also an increased chance of data entry error. Humans make mistakes; WMS doesn’t. Studies have shown, on average, one out of every 300 keystrokes is an error. The cost of even one such error can be significant.

Example: What would be the effect of a missed product of some value, such as the cost of miss shipping a piano to Albany, Oregon, instead of Albany, New York, could easily run in the thousands of dollars. And, this does not take into account the added cost in damaged customer relations. The automated data collection nature of an advanced WMS results in process efficiency and data integrity. The benefits of data integrity are numerous.

Reduced Labor Cost-By eliminating manual data entry, associated fixed labor costs are immediately reduced. These reductions alone can justify an investment in automated data collection which is a key component of WMS. But other labor costs are reduced as well.

Example: Administrative labor is reduced as less time is spent correcting errors. Fewer errors and timelier, accurate information also mean fewer, more productive meetings for managers and executives. In general, automated data collection lowers labor costs by reducing overall setups, idle time, cost of expediting, and time spent correcting errors.

Example: It is reasonable to expect up to a 20% improvement in direct labor productivity. Direct labor is better utilized due primarily to a WMS’s ability to provide specific task assignments based from a concise picture of inventory availability, inventory positions, and the overall movement activities to be accomplished. System directed activities minimize operators time spent identifying what actions need to be accomplished and planning the activities once they have been identified.

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Ways Warehouse Management Systems Increase Inventory Accuracy

The proper movement of inventory in a warehouse is increasing becoming very complicated as there are more demands from your customers and volume.  As more and more transactions occur, so does the odds for errors.  Errors with inventory picking, packing or shipping always equate to loss revenue, increased labor cost and potentially unhappy or lost customers.

Wholesale Distribution organizations frequently turn to technology to solve this supply chain management challenge to keep errors at an absolute minimum through a high inventory transaction accuracy level.  Such a technology exist with Warehouse Management Systems (WMS), which are designed to ensure the highest level of inventory accuracy and efficient inventory flow through the use of advanced inventory tracking software and systems.  Below are some examples of ways warehouse management technology can increase accuracy:Warehouse Man with Scanner

1. Product Codes:  Whether you chose RFID or barcoding as a means of identifying various products, product coding greatly adds to warehouse accuracy. Pickers and packers can simply scan the items they are looking for to fill an order and immediately known if they are correct. This contributes to less accidental switches and confusion when picking and packing order.

2. Product Location:  Using a WMS solution to help design your warehouse for efficiency will help your pickers know exactly where they need to go for a product location. This reduces misplacement of items. In addition, pick times are lessened when items are arranged so that quick turnover products are close to packing and slow moving inventory is placed in lower traffic areas of the warehouse.

3. Inventory Management:  Having exact product codes and locations greatly improve the quality of the inventory data your company has for inventory management. Knowing exactly how many items are in exactly which bins, to be placed in exactly which orders, can aid in managing stock-outs, misplacements, mis-shipments and even potential theft within the warehouse. With better inventory visibility, orders can be sent faster without back-orders and costs can be cut by less inventory loss.

4. Filling Orders:  Knowing exactly where a product is in a warehouse and knowing how many are left in the bin help pickers fill orders faster. Packing can be expedited with fast-moving products closer to packing locations. In addition, scanning products help to get the orders filled correctly the first time and almost completely eliminate returns due to picking and packing mistakes.

5. Bin Replenishment:  With product data made available by scanning, bin replenishment can be made easy. The system keeps track of how many items are in each bin and slot and can be programmed with rules so that certain product numbers never drop below a certain amount. This removes the guessing from the reordering of inventory and the back-order problem when there are not enough items to fill a customer’s order.

6.  Big Retailer EDI:  When supplying products to a large retailer, it is important to provide them with correctly labeled items that will be read by the retailer’s computer system. Having incorrectly formatted labeling or no Advance Shipment Notice can result in the return of the order and a charge-back for that returned order. With product codes and inventory tracking in conjunction with EDI capabilities, order accuracy can be increased to 99.9%.

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